Daucus Caròta L. Wild Carrot: Ancient Birth-Control
From “An Illustrated Flora Of The Northern United States, Canada And The British Possessions Vol2”, by Nathaniel Lord Britton, Addison Brown.
The use of the crushed seeds of the wild carrot (also known as bird’s nest, bishop’s lace, Queen Anne’s lace) as a method of birth control (via ingestion) dates back to the Ancient Greeks, as recorded by Hippocrates. Modern research suggests that the chemical properties of the plant seeds block progesterone synthesis and may prevent ovum implantation. Wild carrot is still used today for birth control in India.
Unfortunately, while related to the edible domestic carrot, wild carrot bears a strong resemblance to poison hemlock, a potent neurotoxin which causes respiratory collapse and death. 

Daucus Caròta L. Wild Carrot: Ancient Birth-Control

From “An Illustrated Flora Of The Northern United States, Canada And The British Possessions Vol2”, by Nathaniel Lord Britton, Addison Brown.

The use of the crushed seeds of the wild carrot (also known as bird’s nest, bishop’s lace, Queen Anne’s lace) as a method of birth control (via ingestion) dates back to the Ancient Greeks, as recorded by Hippocrates. Modern research suggests that the chemical properties of the plant seeds block progesterone synthesis and may prevent ovum implantation. Wild carrot is still used today for birth control in India.

Unfortunately, while related to the edible domestic carrot, wild carrot bears a strong resemblance to poison hemlock, a potent neurotoxin which causes respiratory collapse and death.